For my twentieth birthday, I received a camera. I have always wanted a camera since I was sixteen. As I was born in a middle-class family, it was quite difficult for my dad to save enough while making ends meet. But by the time I turned twenty I had a DSLR camera. It was Canon 77D with a 50mm prime lens I felt that they were perfectly engineered for quick, slightly accurate portraits. I fell in love with the machine and how it captures and turns it in a painting. I decided that, despite my lack of skills, I would learn to photograph. “It’s a process,” I thought, “and I am a savant of logic; I can compensate for my lack of skills with my logical thought, how hard it could be.” To celebrate my decision, I photographed everyone there, most of the pictures where either overexposed or underexposed but a hand full of them were okay, these are the first photographs I took.

I leafed through the book until I had a sufficient grasp of the principles of photography. Feeling confident, I picked up the camera and attempted to apply my knowledge. After several weeks of practice and hours of intensive analysis, I pinpointed my difficulty: the balancing of the light. I needed something to get hang of this. Basically, there are three ways you can control the light in the camera, IOS, Shutter Speed and Aperture. The art is balancing light with all three to create a painting. After weeks of intensive practice, I mastered first the rudiments and then the intricacies of photography. When I could finally take the photographs I wanted to, it was official: Photography was my hobby.

The ritual began, the sun would still be asleep, while the empty streets await the morning rush, I would be there in the street all through the golden hours to capture life as I see and experience it. The idea of cherishing a moment all throughout my life made me feel immortal. I started to understand that these photographs can cause an emotional reaction deeper than simply observing a recorded point of time. I wondered to myself how simple it was to create something of such artistic value.